Freeform Lenses: The Difference Is Clear

Measuring a frame wrap angle around a face for custom progressive lenses.

Measuring a frame wrap angle around a face for custom progressive lenses.

The difference between a freeform (also called digital) and a standard lens is essentially the same as the difference between off-the-rack and tailored clothing.  Both start with a product made for the “average person”.  But there is no such thing as an average person.  So, the item must be adjusted to fit precisely.  For an important occasion, like a wedding, we have our clothing adjusted for the optimal fit.  This is exactly what freeform lenses do for your eyes.  The big difference is that you may wear that fancy tailored outfit only once, while you’ll wear your glasses every day.

Lens Distance — It Varies 

If you think about your eye moving behind the lens of your eyeglasses, you’ll realize that the lens is farthest from your eye along the edges and is closest in the middle, where the lens is directly in front of your eye.  That variation in distance is unique to each person, depending on the size of your eyes, the shape of your face and how the frame sits on you.  The tilt of the frame and its shape also alter the distance between your eye and the lens at different points.  A generic lens blank cannot accommodate these variations.  This means that you are likely to experience distortion as your eye moves within the frame unless the lens is customized to account for these unique variables.

Progressive lenses present an additional challenge because the lens also has to change in power from the top portion (where you look straight ahead for distance) to the bottom edge of the lens, where the power is higher for your reading prescription.  For the most comfortable and sharp vision correction, you need a smooth transition with the cleanest curves and the least amount of peripheral distortion.

Customizing Options — Not All Are Equal

There are a variety of ways to achieve a tailored lens fit. Some, of course, are better than others.  They all created of chunky lens blank, but on different equipment.   Here’s a quick look:

  • Conventional/Traditional (K, J Options for VSP Customers): After your optician tries the frame on you and takes the measurements, the customized changes are ground onto the front of the lens and the lens is then polished.  This is the least expensive option, but it has significant shortcomings.  The grinding and polishing processes cause friction, which heats up the lens, causing it to warp slightly and creating distortion.  This process is the least accurate, so it creates the greatest area of “swim” in your peripheral vision, which causes some people to experience dizziness.  In addition, placing the customized adjustment on the front of the lens puts the correction farther away from your eye, so your eyes have to work harder to bring the world into focus.
Making your conventional lens

Making your conventional lens

  • Digital (F option for VSP): This process utilizes a Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machine tool – the same high tech instrument used for creating precision parts for the aviation industry.  Your unique measurements are fed into the the computer that controls the machine tool, so the adjustments are very precise, creating a smooth, comfortable curve.  The adjustments are made to both the front and back of the lens and there is no vibration, which can lead to distortion.  Because the process is so precise, very little polishing is needed.  The lenses stay at room temperature and do not warp.  We recommend this option for progressives and for single vision lenses with high prescription or high astigmatism.
inside-of-sufacing-lens-digitallyjpg

Digitally made lenses on CNC machine.

  • Total Customization (O, N Options for VSP): This option, which only costs an additional $10 for VSP customers, involves additional measurements, including the tilt of the frame you have selected, how it wraps around your face and the distance from your eye (cornea) to the back of the lens. The goal is to create multiple optical centers so they can “follow” your eye movements. (Think honeycomb pattern). It will give you stability switching  between different frames and comfort of reading (by eliminating an image displacement). This option gives you very precise, accurate visual correction, even in your periphery.
Polishing for freeform lenses

Polishing of freeform lenses

 

 

Titanium: The Super Metal

BLACKFIN Frame: Front- PURE TITANIUM (90%-to-100% titanium) Temples-BETA TITANIUM. An alloy, beta titanium is usually composed of 75% titanium combined with 22% vanadium (for hardness) and 3% aluminum (for lightness).

BLACKFIN Frame:
Front- PURE TITANIUM (90%-to-100% titanium)
Temples-BETA TITANIUM. An alloy, beta titanium is usually composed of 75% titanium combined with 22% vanadium (for hardness) and 3% aluminum (for lightness).

Titanium is named for the Titans – the race of giant gods that preceded the famous Greek gods of Mount Olympus –a name reflecting this metal’s super-hero strength.   Ready to be impressed?  Titanium’s melting point is 3020 degrees Fahrenheit and its boiling point is 5949 degrees Fahrenheit.  Whoa!  That’s one strong metal!

Because of this strength, its resistance to corrosion and because it is inert – meaning it doesn’t react with other substances – titanium is used for everything from spacecraft and missile parts to hip joints and dental implants.  You can see why it’s an awesome material for eyeglass frames.

Staying in Shape

Titanium is way stronger than steel, but it’s almost half as light.  This means that, unlike other metal frames, titanium frames don’t get bent out of shape (pun intended).  They stay comfortable and you don’t have to keep running to the optical office for adjustments (though we are always happy to see you!).  Honestly, you can even fall asleep and roll over on top of them and they probably won’t need adjusting.  That’s pretty impressive!

Avoiding the Yuck Factor

Metal frames made of other materials are subject to corrosion.  Friction as the temples move with your face, combined with perspiration, can provoke a reaction with the copper or nickel in a metal alloy frame, causing a green salt to leach out.  This can literally leave a green line on either side of your face.  Ewww!

Titanium frames, however, do not corrode, so you never have to worry about looking like you have a tattoo gone bad on your face.

Also, titanium is hypoallergenic and contains no nickel, so you don’t have to worry about allergies or irritation.

2-color titanium frame

2-color titanium frame

Fashion and Function

Modern techniques have brought a new range of beautiful colors to the world of titanium frames.  The superior strength of this metal also means that it can be formed into shapes with crisp, clean edges and sleek lines.  We think you’ll love the lightweight feel and superior design.   They cost a little more than metal alloys, but the comfort and durability are well worth it.

Titanium frame by WOOW (France) with matte gray finish

Titanium frame by WOOW (France) with matte gray finish

BLACKFIN titanium booth took first prize at optical trade fair in Milan, Italy in 2015.

Inside of Blackfin titanium booth

Inside of Blackfin titanium booth

Titanium panel

Titanium panel

Onega Astaltsova in front of the booth in Munich, Germany in 2016

Onega Astaltsova in front of the booth in Munich, Germany in 2016

The prestigious Bestand Award is given by eyewear trade show in Italy to the booth that received the highest number of votes from visitors during the exhibition. The BESTAND is awarded to exhibitors who have been able to transform their booth into a “place of wonder” where the furniture, the products and their effective display have been specifically designed to give visitors an unforgettable experience. (photo: ОПТИЧЕСКИЙ Magazine, Russia)

The prestigious Bestand Award is given by eyewear trade show in Italy to the booth that received the highest number of votes from visitors during the exhibition.
The BESTAND is awarded to exhibitors who have been able to transform their booth into a “place of wonder” where the furniture, the products and their effective display have been specifically designed to give visitors an unforgettable experience.
(photo: ОПТИЧЕСКИЙ Magazine, Russia)

Introducing Etnia Barcelona Vintage Collection: An homage to the counterculture

etniaEtnia Barcelona Vintage Collection is a tribute to independent culture. The Vintage collection is composed of 15 sun and prescription models that incorporate metal and original acetates from the seventies (recovered from the Mazzucchelli factories), into which they inject their own signature: colour. Etnia’s Barcelona’s Vintage collection blends classic style with the spirit of the brand, always with exquisite attention to every detail.

The collection is made up of 15 colours inspired by the history of eyeglasses for the base of the frame. Dark colours like brown, glass or honey are combined to imitate tortoise shells. Colours known internationally as “havanas”, “tortoise” or “carey”. These dark colours are combined with acetates and metals that the Etnia Barcelona design team has created for the insides of the frames, giving us a glimpse of dozens of ethnic patterns in textures like stripes, herringbones and horns.

Vintage acetates meets ethnic acetates.

Etnia Barcelona wanted to combine a classic look with the spirit of the brand. The Vintage collection displays their ethnic identity on the inside of the frame. This collection was designed to create a vital connection with the person wearing the glasses. This connection is based on the acetates that Etnia Barcelona has designed to dress up the inner surface of the temples. A dozen ethnic colours were designed based on herringbones, stripes and horn textures. The lamination created by Etnia Barcelona makes it possible to glimpse the interior colour of the frame on the temple tips.

bloc of acetate

Ethnic patterns

montauk-derd

Unisex panthos frame. The Etnia Barcelona Vintage collection is characterised by its recovered acetates, shapes and colour combinations that recall our past. Coloured pins and daring textures on the tips make the difference.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top quality vintage lenses.

etnia lenses

High-definition, photochromatic, flat, polarised and anti-reflective lenses make up the range of this Vintage collection.

The Vintage collection uses mineral lenses also created in the seventies, always by Barberini. By selecting more than 17 types of lenses that fit the vintage aesthetic while at the same time providing maximum eye protection thanks to their special properties.

Details.

Etnia designing work.

The Etnia Barcelona Vintage collection is full of details. The metal core of the frames was designed with Art Nouveau motifs by the brand’s design team. This metal temple rod can be glimpsed inside the acetate and is the core that structures the frame and connects with the hinge that joins the front to the temple. This decoration of the metal rods was engraved with a laser to achieve high precision in the lines of the motif.

Vintage-inspired shapes reworked.

Dematteis living in Brera

Dematteis living in Brera

We have reworked forms based on vintage trends and styles to create a collection that fuses the brand’s spirit with old-school style.

The Vintage collection is inspired by cultural and intellectual movements, and everything that ventures off the well-worn path to create a culture of independence.

And so, when it came time to name the models in this collection, we looked for places impregnated with culture and creativity. It’s an homage to these neighbourhoods and their inhabitants.

Each model takes its name from a historic neighborhood in a major world city, known for the cultural movements that started there and defined each of them.

Redefining “Made in America”

IEM-Independent Eyewear Manufacturing

Entrance to State Optical eyewear manufacturing facilities, Chicago area, Illinois, USA

Since everyone is welcome to visit State Optical’s facilities to see eyewear manufacturing, we decided to visit the factory, located in suburb of Chicago, in July 2016. It was an incredible experience. We love the building’s picturesque location and its modern interior design, which includes an upcoming interior basketball court.

Skilled workers,or craftsmen wear t-shirts with the logo IEM—Independent Eyewear Manufacturing. Craftsmen in training, however, don’t have the right to wear the shirt. They have to earn it. Jason and Marc do the training and it takes about six months for a typical craftsman to come up to full speed. Why? Because over 50% of State’s acetate frame production is done by hand and it takes an average of 70 different steps to make a basic acetate frame.

Jason and Onega

Jason Stanley of IEM and Onega Astaltsova at State Optical eyewear manufacturing, USA Jason Stanley was a judge for America’s finest optical store contest in 2016, holding by professional eyewear publication. Onega was a judge for the same contest in 2015.

IEM uses a total of 60 pieces of equipment and 42 of them are brand new. Of all of these, the team is the most proud of the state-of-the-art factory Computer Numerically Controlled, or CNC machine, which cuts the front of the frames. It is one of the most high tech eyewear manufacturing pieces of equipment in the world. Only two such machines exist and both are at IEM facilities. One of them has been named “MASON” after Marc and Jason. It is a phenomenal piece of equipment.

Watch the video, there Scott shares the dream about making things in America:

 

Read full story on State Optical in our May 2016 blog.

“Mr.Leight” : new capsule collection by father-son duo Larry and Garrett Leight

Larry Leight, founder of Oliver Peoples, and son Garrett Leight pose for a portrait at his home in Santa Monica, Calif.  Larry Leight has left Oliver Peoples after 30 years to join his son Garrett's company, Garrett Leight California Optical (Photo:Patrick T. Fallon / For The Times)

Larry Leight, founder of Oliver Peoples, and son Garrett Leight pose for a portrait at his home in Santa Monica, Calif.
Larry Leight has left Oliver Peoples after 30 years to join his son Garrett’s company, Garrett Leight California Optical (Photo:Patrick T. Fallon / For The Times)

The father-son duo Larry and Garrett Leight will launch a new capsule collection.

Here is an article by Mellissa Magsaysay for Los Angeles Times on June 18′ 2016:

On a May afternoon at eyewear design guru Larry Leight’s Santa Monica home, Leight, founder of Oliver Peoples, and his son, Garrett, founder of Garrett Leight California Optical, took a break from actual work to consider how they each created successful eyewear labels that have captured the cool, in-the-know crowd of their respective generations.

“I didn’t really realize what he did for a living until I went to work for him,” says Garrett, 32. “I saw that not only did he design eyewear, but he really led that team, that environment and that company – and that’s when I was like, ‘Wow, now I really know what he does.’”

Aside from similarities such as profession, stature and surname, father and son finish each other’s thoughts and have a similar magnetism for attracting a cult-like following of loyal fans and talented employees. Together, they have joined forces to create a capsule collection of luxury eyewear called Mr. Leight.

Eyewear wasn’t always the clear choice for Garrett as a profession.

In 2006, however, the younger Leight (the family name is pronounced “light”), who was focused on tennis and studied journalism, went to work at Oliver Peoples at the suggestion of his father to gain work experience. Garrett eventually left Oliver Peoples, and went into business for himself.

“I think he was absorbing and gathering all these things that formulated his desire to do something different,” says Larry, 65. “He felt that there was a better way to do things that inspired him to see different areas of the business that he felt he could do differently or better.”

In November 2009, Garrett opened A. Kinney Court on Abbot Kinney Boulevard, a lifestyle concept store in Venice with opticians, eyewear, footwear, apparel, books and music.

Garrett soon became inspired to create his own collection and created his namesake business in 2011.

“I felt most comfortable in doing what my dad was doing,” says Garrett. “Being an entrepreneur wasn’t really a word that I understood before that time, but I think I just wanted to be a leader and wanted to build my own culture and environment. It was also being around great people that inspire you. That’s what I loved about Oliver Peoples.”

Today, Garrett Leight California Optical eyewear is available through about 800 wholesale accounts worldwide as well as four stand-alone GLCO stores. The eyewear has framed the famous faces of January Jones, Kristen Stewart, Leonardo DiCaprio and Kendall Jenner and spawned collaborations with Clare Vivier, Want Les Essentiels and Mark McNairy.

“You have to kind of pinch yourself,” says Larry about Garrett’s success. “The similar thing between us is, ‘How the hell did he come along and grab that young cult of today?’”

Harding GLCO

Harding GLCO

Hampton GLCO

Hampton GLCO

Cabrillo GLCO

Cabrillo GLCO

In 2006, Larry sold Oliver Peoples to Oakley, and the following year, Italian eyewear brand Luxottica acquired California-based Oakley. Larry retained his creative role until his departure at the end of 2015.

Larry says he spent months after leaving Oliver Peoples trying to decided what he’d do next. “I realized that even if I didn’t know Garrett, his is the company I want to work for,” he says.

Inspired by his son’s business and brand, the veteran eyewear designer and accessory brand icon was brought on earlier this year as a design consultant at GLCO and to collaborate on the Mr. Leight collection.

“Mr. Leight is a name I’ve had in my pocket for a while,” says Garrett. “And I always dreamed that maybe we’d have the opportunity to do something together and that name would obviously make sense.”

While in the design phase, the Mr. Leight collection will have frames made in Japan with a starting cost of $700, and, going forward, the eyewear will skirt traditional fashion cycles.

“It’s more limited, exclusive and still simple and beautiful,” says Larry about the concept for Mr. Leight, which is set to bow in Spring 2017. “It’s more technical, and there are more moving parts to some of the frames – but not gimmicky.”

In his new role, Larry lends his decades of design experience to Garrett and his team, and he defers to Garrett’s strength for sales and marketing for building a strong brand.

Sunglasses by Father Larry Leight, founder of Oliver Peoples, and son Garrett Leight (Patrick T. Fallon / For The Times)
Using their design and production prowess, the Leights’ team also has their sights set on making Mr. Leight a design house with the idea of collaborating with select like-minded brands to consult with and create eyewear for those brands.

“For sure we have that same entrepreneurial spirit,” the father says of the son. “We’re taking this exciting journey [with Mr. Leight], and it’s different, fresh and desirable.”

An exciting collaborative journey that, because it bears the name they both share, has the potential to pay a humorous dividend next time someone addresses Garrett as “Mr. Leight.” He could respond that he’s Garrett – Mr. Leight is his dad, and their brand.

Copyright © 2016, Los Angeles Times

Garrett and Larry Leight

 

Garrett Leight California Optical collection is available at Providence Optical. Watch our exclusive interview with Garrett in Munich.

Highway Overpass Meets Contemporary Necklace: A New Line of Eyewear Is Born

Ludwig

Contemporary Jewelry:  Sleek, modern, textured, bold, eye-catching, innovative, whimsical.

Road Architecture:  Strong, functional, textured, utilitarian, monochromatic, plain, sometimes ugly.

What do the two have in common?  Look closely.  It’s all about texture.  And  Jacqueline Lung found an incredibly innovative way to bring these two media together.

The Steinar frame is made of steel and real concrete, yet it's light enough to wear.  Photo by Patrick Han.

Lung’s Steinar frame is made of real concrete, yet it’s light enough to wear. Photo by Patrick Han (cargocollective.com/patrickhan).

The Ludwig frame celebrates industrial I-beams as both structure and decor.  Photo by Patrick Han (cargocollective.com/patrickhan).

The Ludwig frame celebrates industrial I-beams as both structure and decor. Photo by Patrick Han.

It all started in Lung’s freshman year at RISD (Rhode Island School of Design), when she fell in love with metalworking, particularly fine details, which add texture to smooth metallic surfaces.  Lung initially worked on jewelry and tableware designs.  And then something strange and wonderful happened:  She discovered eyewear as the nexus of jewelry and function – an accessory that serves a necessity and also conveys the personality of the wearer.  Lung explains:

I believe that … eyewear acts as a symbol of a persona … The relationship between eyewear and its wearer is symbiotic. On one hand the wearer desires the personality of the materials embodied in the eyewear, and on the other hand, the personality of the materials calls for activation by the wearer.

For her RISD Degree Project, Lung took a bold step.  She decided to incorporate boring industrial materials — such as steel, concrete and even duct tape — into her eyewear designs to elevate their status and challenge eyeglass wearers to think about these materials in a new way.  In her handmade line of eyewear, Industrial Spectacles, Lung brings out the hidden beauty in these materials.  Says Lung:

Gunta, 2016. Polycabonate, duct tape

Shiny, ugly duct tape transforms into a soft, velvety, grey textile. Concrete presents itself as delicate graphic elements, rather than as massive spacious structures in which we reside. Parts of screws that are normally hidden below the surface are displayed, remaining functional while destabilizing the expectation of how they could be used. The hidden character of these materials are given agency as they rise to the surface and become accessible in the format of eyewear.

Each frame in Lung’s new collection bears a name that reflects its featured material.

Archytas playfully showcases screws as a design element. Photo by Patrick Han

Archytas playfully showcases screws as a design element. Photo by Patrick Han

– Archytas: named after Archytas of Tarentum, an ancient Greek mathematician who is often credited as the inventor of screws

– Steinar: a Scandinavian name that combines “stone” and “warrior, referencing concrete and  its origins

– Ludwig: named after Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, paying homage to his extensive use of I beams in architecture as both structural and decorative elements

Akira blends steel and  duct tape into sleek shape with velvety texture.  Photo by Patrick Han.

Akira blends steel and duct tape into sleek shape with velvety texture. Photo by Patrick Han.

– Akira: named after Akira Yoshizawa, a Japanese origami master, reflecting the foldable structure created by steel and duct tape in this piece

– Gunta: named after Gunta Stölzl, who was a Bauhaus weaving master, in reference to the duct tape weave structure.

Lung’s Archytas spectacles with mirror sun lenses are available at RISD Works store and  at www.jacquelinelung.com
Dare to see yourself – and these materials – differently!

Archytas

Archytas, 2016. Steel

OpticMag, June 2016 Jackie Lung

Special feature in “ОПТИЧЕСКИЙ Magazine” (OPTICmag), Moscow, Russia JUNE 2016 Публикация в журнале “ОПТИЧЕСКИЙ Magazine”, июнь 2016

Meet new members of edCFDA (Eyewear Designers of The Council of Fashion Designers of America, Inc)

Javits Center, NYC

Eyewear show at Javits Center, NYC. April 2016

In 2014, the CFDA launched the Eyewear Designers of the CFDA (edCFDA), a working group within the CFDA. Created by 12 CFDA Member eyewear designers, the group’s aim is to inspire, empower, and promote awareness of eyewear design and the vitality of the optical industry through promotion, education, mentoring and collaborative initiatives.

In April 2016 new members,designers Patty Perreira (BARTON PERREIRA), Blake Kuwahara (BLAKE KUWAHARA), Christian Roth (CHRISTIAN ROTH), Daniel Silberman (ILLESTEVA), Gai Gherardi (L.A. EYEWORKS), Shane Baum (LEISURE SOCIETY), Jeff Press (MORGENTHAL FREDERICS), Robert Marc (ROBERT MARC), and Selima Salaun (SELIMA OPTIQUE), presented new eyewear designs at International Vision Expo in New York during the first ever Eyewear Showcase.

Selima Salaun (SELIMA OPTIQUE)

Selima Salaun (SELIMA OPTIQUE)

Emily Teel, a regular contributor to Edible Philly and Foobooz, the food bloger for Philadelphia Magazine, has a soft spot for all things gastronomical, she is also a devoted eyewear aficionado. She had an opportunity to interview two NYC-based designers – Selima Salaun and Robert Marc about their favorite palces to go out.

Selima Salaun

eb: When you do go out, is there a neighborhood that you like to stay in?


ss: I try to take [clients] to the new, hip places. Like, for instance, The Standard [Hotel in the Meatpacking District]. It looks like a “Barbarella” setup.

eb: For the folks who are not as lucky to be able to dine with you, where would you suggest?

ss: I adore Daniel Boulud; his food is amazing. DBGB is much cheaper than his places uptown, and if you go see a show at Lincoln Center, just across the street is Boulud Sud. I also love Mercer Kitchen, Locanda Verde, and Momofuku.

Robert Marc

rm: … I think the West Village has so many small, chic, fabulous places to have a great dinner. It’s just a charming, wonderful part of the city with cobblestone streets, townhouses, [and] small, quaint restaurants.



eb: Are there places that you really love there?

rm: Sant Ambroeus. Great little place. And I Sodi. Both are small Italian restaurants, so I’d recommend reservations. Another great place is En, a fantastic Japanese restaurant. It is very glamorous, big, fun, and really wonderful.



eb: Any New York “must-visit” spots for you?


rm: Right now? The High Line and the new Whitney Museum of Art. Absolutely spectacular. Because the show is later this year, the weather is going to be nicer. Which is great, [because] the High Line starts at 34th Street and 12th Avenue, really right next to the Javits Center, so you can walk down the High Line all the way to the Whitney at the other end.

Robert Mark & Charlotte Labyt

Robert Marc (ROBERT MARC EYEWEAR) & Charlotte Labyt

Gai Gerardi (L.A.EYEWORKS)

Gai Gerardi (L.A.EYEWORKS)

Patty Perreira (BARTON PERREIRA)

Patty Perreira (BARTON PERREIRA)

Blake Kuwahara (BLAKE KUWAHARA) & Onega Astaltsova

Blake Kuwahara (BLAKE KUWAHARA) & Onega Astaltsova

Opti Munich 2016 – Highlights from the vision show

Opti Munich is an annual trade show in the eyewear industry. For the first time this year, we choose to attend this show. A total of 576 exhibitors from 37 countries were present and visitors from 81 countries. This year’s exhibition highlights ranges from a new lens technology for safe driving to the glasses frames made out from pepper or chili and dill to the work of art frames made of paper.

The focus was on quality, creative spirit and incomparably family-like atmosphere. Opti triggers new trends, as the trade fair is flexible in meeting the needs of the market, and setting off new impulses.

Kinto Eyewear – Belgian indépendant Eyewear since 1978. Specialized in petite faces and known for repairable spring hinges.

Thomsen Eyewear – Danish brand, original and contemporary frames made in titanium with classical shape with a bit of color.

748fd254-1335-4d9b-a159-36b8bdcae8eaBarriqule – Born in 2014 in Italy from the idea of Lorenzo Del Tufo. Unisex glasses and sunglasses collections characterized by cellulose acetate fronts and temples in oak recycled from exhausted barrels. Barriqule video

 

 

Paul Hueman – Korean eyewear company specialized in the Asian Fit.

Projekt Samsem – Founded in 2015 in Berlin, the focus of PROJEKT SAMSEN is to create timeless and remarkable goods for everyday life. 3D printed glasses with innovative hinge,
PROJEKT SAMSEN combines new ideas and technologies with timeless aesthetics and values.

All these lines will be soon available at Providence Optical and also in addition new products from existing lines Garrett Leight, Etnia, Lunettes Kollektion, Woow, Dutz Eyewear and Intrigue.

 

 

Benchmarks: Eyewear Decor

Our aviator eyeglasses mirror was mentioned in the article of November-December 2015 edition of INVISION by CORRIE PELC

ART SMART

Eyewear-inspired elements create just the right professional atmosphere
Art can be a tricky thing. What one person loves, another may not. And it’s always very personal — you can tell a lot about someone by the art hanging in his home.

The same is true for your business. The artwork and decor you choose for your eyecare practice or optical shop will be a direct reflection of who you are, the sort of clientele you want to attract and the type of atmosphere you are trying to create.
The six examples here all show how art can be used to make a business more memorable and reflect what the owner wants the business to be. People with artistic skills may decide to go the DIY route and create their own office decor, while others may look to the work of outsiders. Whichever way you go, aim for a look that speaks to both the uniqueness and professionalism of your businesses.

Onega Astaltsova, an artist who is also managing optician of Providence Optical in Providence, RI, says good art will help elevate your business. “As ECPs, we have a professional obligation and the art has to be professional too,” she explains. “You still need to follow the rules of business and not just your personal taste. Good art will help you look professional.”

Need some more inspiration for your space? You’ll find lots of good resources online. TheOpticalVisionSite.com and Pinterest are great resources for decorating ideas, as are Facebook groups such as Opticians on Facebook. You might also work with a local artist, gallery owner or art consultant to help you find or create the look you seek.

DSC_0340

MIRROR, MIRROR
Providence Optical, Providence, RI

➤ With a background in art, it’s no wonder why Onega Astaltsova decided to design an eyewear wall mirror for Providence Optical. Astaltsova says she chose a metal aviator-shaped frame design for the mirror to complement the shop’s large selection of vintage frames. She created a hand drawing of the frame she wanted to depict, then transformed that into a vector computer rendering from which polycarbonate and PVC plastic parts were cut and put together. The finished product is set off by large quotations from literature that help reinforce the idea of Providence Optical as a place that celebrates all the arts.

Etnia Barcelona

Etnia BarcelonaIn ultimate essence an eyewear frame is all about its composed materials, the build of said ingredients and the tech prowess of those materials in active structure. And the whole of that product/object is then in complete coordination to fit on a person’s face and function in securing a lens properly in relationship to that person’s eyes. 

Etnia Barcelona is leading the way with its unique approach to eyewear, making them a worldwide driving force in the optical industry. They are an independent brand of eyewear who has created a wide range of colors, collections and designs for everyone who wants to express him- or herself beyond the cannons imposed by momentary and passing fashion and trends.They are pioneers in the study and application of color resulting in truly unique color combinations and vibrant tortoiseshells that stand apart from the rest. Their designs and overall aesthetic is heavily influenced by fashion and art, both classic and modern, thus offering a wide array of styles for today’s customer.

The eyewear brand Etnia Barcelona was an idea born from the mind of David Pellicer, a man who spent his childhood around sunglasses. He grew up playing in his grandparent’s sunglasses factory in Barcelona, Spain and he grew increasingly interested in how they were made. David Pellicer is carrying on a family legacy that goes back 3 generations, bringing with him vast knowledge of the industry and a passion for glasses.

 

Pioneers of Colour

etniabarcelona_080_03

CEO David Pellicer’s entire eyewear oeuvre is a work of color artistry in and of itself.  The Etnia brand spends as much time inventing the colors of new frames and lenses as they do on the crafting of the frames themselves. In fact, Etnia Barcelona is one of the only eyewear manufacturers to have created some unique five hundred colors patented by them. Etnia’s unique colors and acetates are produced by master artisans Mazzucchelli in Italy, who use only the finest, 100% organic cottons to blend acetates which are then aged for twelve weeks, resulting in the highest quality material possible.

They conducts colour studies twice a year to incorporate new tones into the latest designs, and inspirational moods are generated to imbue the newest collections with life and richness. This dedication has established the company has a true pioneer in the study and application of colour.

Thinking of the Environment

They are also passionate about incorporating sustainable materials into their creations. All Etnia Barcelona glasses are produced using 100% natural acetate. Not to mention, all of their eyewear is made from natural organic compounds, which means they are recyclable and biodegradable.

Etnia means comfortable fit for all ethnicities

etniabarcelona_080_13 Launched 2003 in Barcelona, Spain, Pellicer’s goal in creating Etnia Barcelona was to bring unique colors, the height of technological innovation, a supreme level of wearing comfort, and an avant garde sense of artistry to the world. He also brings an exclusive knowledge of facial anatomy to the table, which makes his frames some of the best fitting, most comfortable glasses in the world. As Pellicer explains, “Comfort and design are the strong points of Etnia Barcelona glasses. Our exhaustive knowledge of facial features is transferred to each piece, thereby producing some of the most comfortable eyewear in the world.” The goal is to create a product that works for many face types, which came from the name “Etnia”. Every pair of Etnia Barcelona is the final assembled product of many smaller pieces of carefully crafted perfection. Likewise, Etnia’s unique hinge mechanism, which allows the glasses to fit fluidly to any face, are made and polished by the manufacturing giants, Comtec.

Etnia is establishing itself by always producing colorful and trendy models at accessible prices.